As Biden meets with his Chinese counterparts living in Beijing, they discuss relations with the United States

BEIJING – Ahead of Monday’s meeting between President Biden and his Chinese counterpart on the sidelines of the G-20 summit in Bali, Beijing residents shared their views on the US-China relationship, Taiwan and their views on the President Biden.

The three-hour meeting between the two leaders came a month after Xi Jinping won a historic third term as leader of the Chinese Communist Party, although Xi and Biden spoke by phone.

“We don’t know much about him,” Zeng, 26, told Fox News Digital when asked what he thought of Biden, “but he comes out a little foggy.” Zeng and everyone else who spoke to Fox News Digital agreed to do so using only their last name.

BIDEN, XI JINPING OF CHINA PRESENCE MEETING AT THE G20 SUMMIT IN INDONESIA

President Biden meets with Chinese President Xi Jinping on the sidelines of the G20 Leaders Summit in Bali, Indonesia on November 11.  14, 2022.

President Biden meets with Chinese President Xi Jinping on the sidelines of the G20 Leaders Summit in Bali, Indonesia on November 11. 14, 2022.
(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

“He always seems like he’s not very clear on what he’s saying,” said another resident who gave his name as Fu to Fox News Digital. “He’s a little old to be president.”

The consensus of those who spoke seemed to be that they lamented the deterioration of the relationship between the two economic superpowers. Not only because it limits people-to-people meetings and travel, but also because trade restrictions have hurt both economies.

Zhang said she was happy Biden was in charge, calling him a “normal” person in charge, while saying he was an improvement on former President Trump.

Zhang, a 35-year-old woman from Beijing, said that “I still have a very positive feeling towards the United States. It is a very powerful and dynamic country. But the things that left a bad impression on me were the way Trump carried out . himself and the changes regarding abortion.”

HAVING THE SIZE OF BIDEN, PUTIN INVITED UKRAINE. TAIWAN MUST PRAY XI DOES NOT MAKE A SIMILAR ASSESSMENT

People wearing face masks line up for COVID-19 tests at a testing site during the second consecutive day of mass testing in Beijing, Wednesday, May 4, 2022. Beijing closed about 10% of the stations on Wednesday its extensive subway system as an additional measure against the spread of the coronavirus.

People wearing face masks line up for COVID-19 tests at a testing site during the second consecutive day of mass testing in Beijing, Wednesday, May 4, 2022. Beijing closed about 10% of the stations on Wednesday its extensive subway system as an additional measure against the spread of the coronavirus.
(AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

Zheng, a 67-year-old retiree, told Fox News Digital that all countries, but especially the world’s two economic superpowers, had a responsibility to maintain global stability. “When we cooperate, we all win. If we don’t, ordinary people are the ones who lose the most,” he added.

“There is a strong feeling in the media that the United States is not respecting China and the Chinese people and that we must defend ourselves,” says Zeng. This “US vs. China” narrative is nothing new.

“Many influential people in China, for example, are saying that the power of the United States is waning. However, many people still wish to go to the United States,” said the 67-year-old pensioner.

In addition to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and North Korea’s persistent nuclear threats, Biden is expected to address the situation around Taiwan. US-China ties have deteriorated sharply since House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., visited Taiwan earlier this year. China sees the island as a renegade province and responded to the visit with large-scale military exercises.

“I feel that the United States wants to divide China,” said Deng, a 27-year-old bartender.

TO CHINA’S MILITARY PLANNERS, TAIWAN IS NOT AN EASY ISLAND TO INVADE

A member of the People's Liberation Army looks through binoculars during military exercises as the Taiwanese frigate Lan Yang is seen in the background, Friday, Aug. 2.  5, 2022.

A member of the People’s Liberation Army looks through binoculars during military exercises as the Taiwanese frigate Lan Yang is seen in the background, Friday, Aug. 2. 5, 2022.
(Lin Jian/Xinhua via AP)

“Maybe it’s good for the United States to look at its own human rights problems first before getting involved in those of the people of Taiwan or Hong Kong,” Fu said, echoing a regular Chinese government line.

“I was brought up to see Taiwan, historically, as a part of China that has to be reunited with the motherland. But now, I think it would be best to leave it as it is. Maybe one day it can serve as a middle ground between mainland China and the States United,” added the 28-year-old Zhu.

“Taiwan is part of China. Regarding relations with Taiwan, the Joint Communiqué on the Establishment of Diplomatic Relations between China and the United States clearly stipulated [that]Zheng said.

Zhang concluded on a note of optimism. “I think China and the United States should be partners, this would benefit everyone.”

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